Politics Information


Social Security Rant


As the Baby Boomer Generation continue to get older, one of the hot topics will continue to be Social Security. Critics claim that Social Security is going bankrupt, and that it needs to be privatized as soon as possible, or people will lose their benefits. This rant examines if Social Security needs to be privatized, and if it is actually going broke.

Thanks to various search engines, and thanks to the Information Superhighway, there is much data to suggest that Social Security-even at the going rate-will be able to pay full benefits at least until 2032, and some research indicates it could survive as long as 2042. Also, seventy-five percent of Social Security funding comes from the payroll tax, which guarantees that Social Security will never go broke. The trick is-in about thirty or forty years, to come up with a system to make up the other twenty-five percent. Those who like to crunch numbers, and those who are familiar with the mathematical formula claim that a raise in the payroll tax by two percent-one percent by the employer, and one percent by the employee, will guarantee the survival of Social Security until the Second Coming. Analysts like to stress the fact that a tax increase-no matter how meager it may or may not be, is not the only solution. With the advancement of technology and medical science, people are living longer than they ever have before. Also, various amounts of disease have been quelled. About ninety years ago, the number one killer in the world was Spanish Influenza. Today, the flu is no longer a serious threat. Also, polio used to be a scourge on society, but these days, that disease has been virtually eradicated off the face of the planet. Thus, it makes sense that the retirement age will-and should-be raised to about 70. Actually, seventy years of age is not old. In fact, it is about the average age, in this country, and well below the average in many industrialized nations in the world.

Of course claiming that Social Security is under-funded is not telling the whole story. Let us look at the facts. So far, on this war on terror, the United States has spent over 300 billion dollars. If that amount is divided by the present population, that equals to about a thousand dollars for every man, woman, and child in the country. Also, do not forget about the hundreds of millions of dollars that "loaned" to other countries in the world. Instead of saying, "Social Security is going broke because of the population", the correct statement should be, "the president believes that there are more important things to spend money on rather than insuring that benefits will be around for years to come."

Whenever Social Security Reform is mentioned, there are always a select few that love to clamor that the system should be privatized. Statistically we know that people spend more than they save. If Social Security should be privatized, what about the millions of people that do not have a bank account? Should those people automatically receive an account? And who is going to make sure that these people get an account--the federal government? That would defeat the purpose of privatizing Social Security in the first place. It's kind of like saying, "let's fix our brakes so we can take the car to the mechanic so he can fix the brakes."

I could do a lot of research and list a lot of data and list a lot of references, or I could use history and common sense to prove that Social Security should never be put in the hands of a private institution. It is certainly true that there have been many government scandals that have cost the taxpayer billions throughout the history of this country. The failure of the Savings and Loans is one example, and the list is quite lengthy. Also, there have been many scandals in the private realm that has wiped out the life savings of countless people. Enron is just one example in a list that I am sure is exhaustive. Thus, the conclusion is that history shows that it government bureaucracy is safer than the private realm, thus leave Social Security alone.

I love debating history and politics. I have two college degrees in those fields. I am glad I have a chance to share some of my thoughts with the rest of the world. Please visit my site today.


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


New York Times

On Politics With Lisa Lerer: 'I Found My Voice'
New York Times
Hi. Welcome to On Politics, your guide to the day in national politics. I'm Lisa Lerer, your host. Man, it has been a week. We knew on Sunday, when The Washington Post dropped the first story about Christine Blasey Ford, that we would be in for a ...

and more »


Vox

Democrats and Republicans are both running on identity politics
Vox
Democrats, like it or not, are running on identity politics in the 2018 midterms. Come to think of it, so are Republicans. After a divisive 2016 Democratic primary, the party fiercely debated whether to emphasize issues important to people of color or ...
'Time for the good ol' boys to step back': Women, politics and the Supreme CourtFinancial Times
Internal RNC Poll: Complacent Trump Voters May Cost GOP Control of CongressBloomberg

all 255 news articles »


New York Times

On Politics With Lisa Lerer: Her Story? Or Theirs?
New York Times
Welcome to On Politics, your guide to the day in national politics. I'm Lisa Lerer, your host. [Get On Politics delivered to your inbox.] On Sunday, Christine Blasey Ford was a lone voice telling her story. Four days later, she might be the only person ...



ABC News

Kavanaugh protests serve as flashpoints as #MeToo movement and politics collide
ABC News
In hearings on the Hill, in the halls outside of congressional offices and in a slew of press conferences, supporters, and opponents of embattled Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh have sought to influence the direction of what participants ...
Trump goes on offensive in Kavanaugh fight, calls on accuser to provide a police reportFox News
Trump just gave cover to the egregious things these politicians have said about the Kavanaugh allegationsWashington Post
The Kavanaugh Case: Memory, Truth and PoliticsNew York Times

all 14,363 news articles »


Week In Politics: The Allegations Facing Supreme Court Nominee Kavanaugh
NPR
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and Margaret Hoover, host of PBS's Firing Line about the ongoing battle over Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Facebook; Twitter



Aljazeera.com

Shin Ji-ye and her aim to challenge sexism in Korean politics
Aljazeera.com
Al Jazeera spoke to the 28-year-old about Korean politics, the male dominance and the obstacles that block aspiring female politicians from coming forward. Al Jazeera: Why did you decide to enter politics? Shin Ji-ye: I started my journey in 2016. I ...



CNN

Recaps and previews: The week in politics, GIF'd
CNN
Recaps and previews: The week in politics, GIF'd. Brenna Williams. Analysis by Brenna Williams, CNN. Updated 12:08 PM ET, Fri September 21, 2018. (CNN) While the news surrounding Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh dominated the news this ...

and more »


The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Oh My Rod
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Oh My Rod. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein reportedly suggested secretly recording President Trump and invoking the 25th Amendment to remove him from office. Olivia Paschal. 5:30 PM ET. Deputy Attorney ...

and more »


New York Times

On Politics: Kavanaugh Hearing Negotiations Continue
New York Times
Good Friday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today. • Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is prepared to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee next week, ...



FiveThirtyEight

Politics Podcast: Our Forecast Is 7000 Lines Of Code
FiveThirtyEight
In the latest installment of the FiveThirtyEight Politics podcast's “Model Talk,” Nate Silver discusses how unexpected events, like a troubled Supreme Court nomination, are processed by the forecast model. He also answers listener questions about how ...


Google News

home | site map
© 2007