Politics Information


The American Worker: Downward Mobility


All the indicators show an improving economy and, finally, the start of job growth. More than eight million unemployed workers see hope around the corner and re-enter the nightmare of job search with increased enthusiasm and the positive outlook they lost six months ago when they virtually gave up on ever finding a good position.

What do they find?

Service jobs: customer service, hospitality, tourism, food, travel, entry-level healthcare, retail. What are these jobs offering? 30%, 50%, 75% less income than the old manufacturing jobs which have moved to foreign countries. Where are the benefits, the insurance, the paid holidays, retirement plans? Where have the stability, seniority system and regular raises gone?

It is a new world, an evolving economy, a changed future. Everything will work out, government forecasters confidently predict. With tax reductions continuing, the economy will expand and thousands of high-tech, highly compensated positions will be created. Keep the faith, job seekers are advised -- this is the United States where innovation and entrepreneurship always prevail and life gets better and better.

Keep mouthing the platitudes and perhaps the 50 year-old former auto worker with an eleventh grade education or the 60 year-old dislocated engineer with outdated job skills and high blood pressure will actually start to believe it. At least until they return to active job search and encounter the real, not the hypothetical/political, labor market. That is when the true economic progression of twenty-first Century America emerges: an increasing number of millionaires, an increasing number of entry-level, low paid workers, and a great middle class vacuum.

The displaced worker is confronted with the choice of working at a level far below his/her skills, education, and abilities warrant, or staying unemployed. When the government reports that in the near future "Every one who wants a job will get one," the connotation of unemployment is that jobless workers do not WANT to work. This political myth leads to increased depression, diminished self-esteem, and the final conclusion by the legions of the unemployed that their personal fears turned out to be true: they are worthless, unwanted, redundant. The universal anxiety about not being quite good enough, not measuring up, not able to run with the big dogs has been validated and the mental health of the unemployed deteriorates further.

Virginia Bola operated a rehabilitation company for 20 years, developing innovative job search techniques for disabled workers, while serving as a respected Vocational Expert in Administrative, Civil and Workers' Compensation Courts. Author of an interactive and emotionally supportive workbook, The Wolf at the Door: An Unemployment Survival Manual, and a monthly ezine, The Worker's Edge, she can be reached at http://www.virginiabola.com


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


New York Times

On Politics: This Week's Biggest Stories
New York Times
From the sexual assault allegations against Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh to developments in the Russia investigation, it's been a busy week in American politics. Here are some of the biggest stories this week (and some links if you want to read further).



New York Times

On Politics With Lisa Lerer: 'I Found My Voice'
New York Times
Hi. Welcome to On Politics, your guide to the day in national politics. I'm Lisa Lerer, your host. [Get On Politics delivered to your inbox.] Man, it has been a week. We knew on Sunday, when The Washington Post dropped the first story about Christine ...

and more »


CNN

Beer, sausages and politics: German nationalism threatens Oktoberfest
CNN
"The preservation of one's own national people is a priority in politics and for every government," the party said in its manifesto for last year's federal election. Roughly one in eight Germans voted for the AfD in that election, many of them angry ...

and more »


JOE

Congressman Paul Gosar's siblings support opposing candidate in stunning political ad
ABC News
Most political ads follow a familiar formula: tout accomplishments, public testimonials and wrap with the mandatory message of endorsement. Arizona congressional candidate David Brill's ad is no different -- until those criticizing his opponent reveal ...
WATCH: This American political ad has the greatest twist ending this side of a Shyamalan movieJOE
YouTube HTML5 Video PlayerYouTube
Arizona Congressman Paul Gosar's Siblings Endorse Rival in New Campaign AdsPhoenix New Times
Kdminer -AZCentral.com -AZCentral.com
all 159 news articles »


The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Oh My Rod
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Oh My Rod. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein reportedly suggested secretly recording President Trump and invoking the 25th Amendment to remove him from office. Olivia Paschal. Sep 21, 2018. Deputy Attorney ...



Fox News

Politicians caught padding their resumes, from fake diplomas to biographical discrepancies
Fox News
From faking diplomas to spreading questionable details about their family backgrounds, many politicians have been accused of misleading their constituents in recent months. One recurring lie -- about education -- has struck many as especially disturbing.



Vox

Democrats and Republicans are both running on identity politics
Vox
Democrats, like it or not, are running on identity politics in the 2018 midterms. Come to think of it, so are Republicans. After a divisive 2016 Democratic primary, the party fiercely debated whether to emphasize issues important to people of color or ...
Trump Voters Have Talked Themselves into a Massive Political MistakeVanity Fair

all 124 news articles »


WNYC

This Week in Politics: A Single-Digit Showdown for Senate in NJ
WNYC
With all the focus on efforts to flip the House this November, and the media coverage of contested congressional seats in New Jersey and New York, one could be forgiven for forgetting there's a U.S. Senate race going on in the Garden State. And ...



Week In Politics: The Allegations Facing Supreme Court Nominee Kavanaugh
NPR
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and Margaret Hoover, host of PBS's Firing Line about the ongoing battle over Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Facebook; Twitter



New York Times

On Politics With Lisa Lerer: Her Story? Or Theirs?
New York Times
Politics has a way of chewing people up and leaving their lives almost unrecognizable. But the speed and aggression by which both parties have transformed Dr. Blasey's #MeToo story into a political football has been striking. On Capitol Hill, Democrats ...


Google News

home | site map
© 2007